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Ribs vs hard boats


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As some of you already know, I'm considering changing boats in favour of a rib.

The perceived upsides are that as the kids get older and want to do more jumping and swimming from the boat, a rib enables "launch and recovery" better, without the need necessarily for a boarding ladder. Same is true for adults swimming or diving from it.

I can trailer a rib to the south-west for fishing/boating/diving, and also keep it on the dry stack at Gosport as a home marina.

What are the downsides to rib ownership that I haven't thought of?

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23 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

As some of you already know, I'm considering changing boats in favour of a rib.

The perceived upsides are that as the kids get older and want to do more jumping and swimming from the boat, a rib enables "launch and recovery" better, without the need necessarily for a boarding ladder. Same is true for adults swimming or diving from it.

I can trailer a rib to the south-west for fishing/boating/diving, and also keep it on the dry stack at Gosport as a home marina.

What are the downsides to rib ownership that I haven't thought of?

 

Probably the biggest for most will be that RIBS have less fishing real estate than a hard boat, but all the plus points more than compensate.

You WILL need a boarding ladder for diving and also for swimming, however you could always climb up the engine.

Also, there are RIB'S, and then there are RIB's, you will need to do some careful research.

I use RIBCRAFT because they are a totally British brand that has been going since the early 80's  and has a strong pedigree in sea handling, quality of build, and durability.

For a growing family and also towing, I guess you will be looking at 6.8m (or a minimum of 6m), but ideally a 4x4 to tow with (my 5.85m is 1.6T)....... if you want a new 6.8m RIBCRAFT built, then I believe you are looking at a 2 year wait.

Remember that RIB's hold their price, so either new or S/H the money is strong. Mine is 3 years old now, but it was recently valued by a local Chandler / Broker, and I wouldn't even lose the original VAT if I sold it on............. I renewed the insurance today, and my insurers recommended that I kept the original value.

Edited by GPSguru
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Why no access over the tubes @GPSguru?

Ribs always seem to keep their value, even before the Covid boat price rises. I'll have to fire a footman to pay for one...

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1 minute ago, Andy135 said:

Why no access over the tubes @GPSguru?

Ribs always seem to keep their value, even before the Covid boat price rises. I'll have to fire a footman to pay for one...

Might be OK swimming, but not with diving gear on.

A lot of RIBS have a rope  boarding stirrup that you just lob over the side, others have a small fixed boarding ladder on the transom, diving boats often have a dive ladder that is stowed and lowered from the A frame.

I don't have anything, as the idea is to stay IN the boat 🙄

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23 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

Ribs always seem to keep their value, even before the Covid boat price rises. I'll have to fire a footman to pay for one...

 

A RIBCRAFT 6.8m, starts at £62k for the basic boat, my 5.85m starts at £40K ............. then add the trailer, probably a different consol, possibly a different seating layout, larger fuel tank, twin batteries, changes to tube hardware, bowroller, electronics etc, and the cost soon spirals .... ask me how I know !

There are less than a handful of 6.8m 2010 - 2012 boats around at the moment and those are fetching £35 - £40k

Other RIB's to consider are Humber, and the new Solent Rib's

Like hard boats, not all RIB's are Deep Vee (all RIBCRAFT are), but all still perform reasonably well as the Vee is continued for the length of the hull, which is why they work so well.

Avoid chinky crap like Highfield etc, also avoid the Zodiac Pro range as the build quality is apparently shocking.

Edited by GPSguru
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I loved my rib but as above they are limited on space so you need to be more organised in regards to gear. In saying that I loaded my 550pro with enough gear to stay offshore fro more than a week at a time, which meant extra drums of fuel and water as well as camping gear, fishing, spearing etc etc fro 4 people. Yep even a guitar was onboard for that trip!!!!...80km offshore dropped onto a remote island. This was our first offshore island hopping trip, after this we cut the gear down by a huge amount, also only done it with two people since. Got caught in winds over 30kn on the 80k run home, which was interesting!!!!

IMG_0791.JPG.30d92186c9f780145a4e3c8f8ba99eae.JPG

 

We never had any issues getting in and out of the rib from the water but there is a technique to doing it and you need fins (flippers) on to get that kick of thrust to almost swim up into the boat as you pull on the rope. Plenty of folding step options if it is a problem. Getting in couldn't be any easier or more fun, simply roll in or bounce and jump like an excited 5yr old!!!!. Even with dive gear we had no problems, if it was scuba gear it was a case of slipping out of the bcd and passing the weight belt over the tubes onto the floor. I had a lanyard that I could clip the tanks and bcd's to which I could pull in once settled back onboard. Our weight belts are weighted without weight at the front, so more at the back and sides, which helps when getting in the boat and also assists in tilting your body backwards at the surface if you blackout and are correctly weighted. Guns should always be unloaded before getting back into a boat and only loaded while in the water, also passing a gun to anyone from the water should be done handle first. Spear tips pointed towards the back of the boat with covers over the tip is a good idea. 

 

The boats themselves are vastly different from traditional boats, they simply punch well above their weight in rough conditions. You still need to be careful as you can launch off waves and get head winds under the front making you land stern first if not careful, or perhaps let an overly keen youngster behind the wheel who love pushing the throttle down!!!! Mine didn't rock at rest as it simply only moved with waves, so putting 4 -5 adults on ones side barley made any change to how it sat.

You will get people who say what if you get a puncher!!!!...well depending on what boat you have you will most likely have 5-7 seperate chambers and if its anything like our Zodiacs it will still remain afloat if all chambers were punched or removed. What happens to a glass, wooden or aluminium boat with a hole however is they sink!!!!!... Also getting a hole fixed is often something you can do very quickly and if its a very small leak, its just a case of lowering the air pressure and putting a small spot of superglue over the hole, leave for 10 mins and blow it back up.

Fishing from them is far different, you don't have anything to lean against during a fight, so it's more you and the fish (more fun). My concern was always big species like tuna that do circles under the boat, where contact with braid and tubes was something to be careful of. Releasing sharks never seemed a problem, though I did always keep the boat moving so they didn't thrash about alongside.

I do miss not having my rib but the fact my daughter bought the 500pro means I still get to head out in hers. Worst part for me was anchoring, mostly because of a stuffed back. Im sure I could of fitted an electric drum winch but went the easy way out and bought a different boat for anchoring. 

Hypalon would be my first choice and try and get in a few different boats to see if they are wet in the chop, my one was very dry but earlier models were wet I believe. Ive been in Gemini ribs that handled very well but were so wet that I don't think I could live with one!!!!

Sold mine 2014 model for around 12 grand (English) with trailer and 12ins hds gen 3 etc. Bought my daughters for 7 grand, also 2014 with 38hrs on the motor, like a new rig, trailer looked like it had never seen water.

 

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_JDP9460.jpg.a20ed29945d7fd972e8df7b3bc199d4c.jpg

 

 

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For kids jumping in the sea swimming a shaft driven boat with a swim platform and a boarding ladder must be the safest and easiest, no nasty bits of metal sticking out to kill your self on. You aren’t going to be wanting your kids climbing up the engine so strike that comment from the record, or using your transducer as a step up. Even when my youngest girl was about 7 years old she had no problem with access and egress on my boat. 
I also have a rope about 40’ long with swimming pool lane floats on and a bouy on the end that makes it easier in the tide. 
Also as for drawbacks, look at the company you wine keep ffs.🖕

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We bought a Rib as hard boats hard to get on drive, and launch and recover,

deep v rib tubes don`t sit in water so boat rocks at rest,but great fun in rough seas,

if you wan`t a stable rib for fishing tubes need to be both touching water at rest,

if buying new you can configure as you want,we bought from XS-ribs and had console and seats fitted so as to give more room

we had the screen and st/steel surround made locally for a 1/3 rd of price of OE.

bear in mind no cuddy to shelter in,

Rib is easy to launch and recover and can be pushed up drive.

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41 minutes ago, mick said:

We bought a Rib as hard boats hard to get on drive, and launch and recover,

deep v rib tubes don`t sit in water so boat rocks at rest,but great fun in rough seas,

if you wan`t a stable rib for fishing tubes need to be both touching water at rest,

if buying new you can configure as you want,we bought from XS-ribs and had console and seats fitted so as to give more room

we had the screen and st/steel surround made locally for a 1/3 rd of price of OE.

bear in mind no cuddy to shelter in,

Rib is easy to launch and recover and can be pushed up drive.

My zodiac had 24.5' v and the tube sit in the water, so gives stability and soft ride. I think my daughters zodiac has 24'v . Do you know what degree yours has ?

1960260092_ScreenShot2022-04-01at9_15_48pm.png.22cc1a6f5f8898df2cbdbf0fb4efc809.png

Edited by JDP
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1 hour ago, mick said:

deep v rib tubes don`t sit in water so boat rocks at rest,but great fun in rough seas

My Ribcraft is 21.5 degrees, and sits in the water Ok at rest.

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My last rib had a 22.5 degree deadrise at stern,It was almost impossible to stand up as boat rocked side to side,

I guess tube size might have played a part

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I love RIBs… especially on a BBQ… 

Anyway, enough of my jokes (it’s been a while 😉 ) 

They are very seaworthy, fast and fun. As GPS says main downside is lack of deck space and no cuddy…. All boats are a compromise but I think you’d be looking at 6m region so not small to trail about. Great summer adventure boats! 
 

Tbere is an art to get in and out. I’ve got a deck door on my not so easy to swim up to and climb up a removable ladder. I did have someone have ro climb on my boat and then I drop them at their boat as they couldn’t get back on… he was a larger gentleman, but it was a good thing it was a sheltered bay in summer so plenety of people to help…

Will Mrs S be happy to be out on an open boat? Or will she be on dry land all day? If so consider a mini rib for inshore stuff, small enough to drag about, go like a rocket on a small outboard and not too much room on the Manor House drive. You can keep a dedicated fishing machine as well then….

 

Run it for a season… see how much use you ACTUALLY get out of it (launch retrieve etc etc) 

https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/boat/1998-grande-3.3-8105260/

Id you love that way of life sell JG and go all out like GPS with a flying machine 😍

Edited by Odyssey
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6 minutes ago, Odyssey said:

I love RIBs… especially on a BBQ… 

Anyway, enough of my jokes (it’s been a while 😉 ) 

They are very seaworthy, fast and fun. As GPS says main downside is lack of deck space and no cuddy…. All boats are a compromise but I think you’d be looking at 6m region so not small to trail about. Great summer adventure boats! 
 

Tbere is an art to get in and out. I’ve got a deck door on my not so easy to swim up to and climb up a removable ladder. I did have someone have ro climb on my boat and then I drop them at their boat as they couldn’t get back on… he was a larger gentleman, but it was a good thing it was a sheltered bay in summer so plenety of people to help…

Will Mrs S be happy to be out on an open boat? Or will she be on dry land all day? If so consider a mini rib for inshore stuff, small enough to drag about, go like a rocket on a small outboard and not too much room on the Manor House drive. You can keep a dedicated fishing machine as well then….

 

Run it for a season… see how much use you ACTUALLY get out of it (launch retrieve etc etc) 

https://www.boatsandoutboards.co.uk/boat/1998-grande-3.3-8105260/

Id you love that way of life sell JG and go all out like GPS with a flying machine 😍

Good thoughts. Mrs135 is unlikely to be out on any boat as she's not really a boat person. It'll be just me and the kids. I had considered getting a Takacat or SIB of some sort to do the adventure boating thing around the south west, but I'd hesitate to go after bigger stuff on such a small craft. Lots to think about, but no rush to make a change.

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You have sharks available near where you store JG, why do you need another boat to chase them down the SW? If you want to scratch the jumbo mack then just charter, just like we are this year. 

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45 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

Good thoughts. Mrs135 is unlikely to be out on any boat as she's not really a boat person. It'll be just me and the kids. I had considered getting a Takacat or SIB of some sort to do the adventure boating thing around the south west, but I'd hesitate to go after bigger stuff on such a small craft. Lots to think about, but no rush to make a change.

Big stuff is not an issue, as you know, I don't tend to report my catches of sharks etc.

TBH my biggest concern was sharks hacking at the chum bucket, but I also got a bit concerned with a very angry porgie that we hooked. My biggest fish, (an oversized Mackerel) went 109.75 inches, and TBH I doubt that I will ever beat that, so this last 2 years I have concentrated on wreck fishing.

Fighting very big fish from a RIB is hard graft as you have no leverage points, you have to take the fight to the fish.

Regarding fish hooks and tubes…… provided the hypalon tubes are at the correct pressure, the hooks slide over the tubes and do not dig in.

I am on day 6 of covid now, days 4/5 were a real battle with dropping oxy levels, but Ok now. As an aside, the UTI has come out to play again, but the GP is dropping of a ‘one hit wonder’ antibiotic that should see it off ( you just mix it up and take it once).

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Saintly Fish said:

You have sharks available near where you store JG, why do you need another boat to chase them down the SW? If you want to scratch the jumbo mack then just charter, just like we are this year. 

The sharks our way are threshers, which are few and far between. The blues are more plentiful in the SW, and of course there's the big mackerel.

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18 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

The sharks our way are threshers, which are few and far between. The blues are more plentiful in the SW, and of course there's the big mackerel.

I bet we get more than Threshers around our way. Just ask @JDP

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18 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

The sharks our way are threshers, which are few and far between. The blues are more plentiful in the SW, and of course there's the big mackerel.

What does that Spence guy fish for from IOW?

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12 minutes ago, Saintly Fish said:

I bet we get more than Threshers around our way. Just ask @JDP

I've heard of the (very) occasional porbeagle, but that's all.

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9 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

I've heard of the (very) occasional porbeagle, but that's all.

But shaky Spence caught millions of sharks, must be something else there?

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19 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

I've heard of the (very) occasional porbeagle, but that's all.

In lyme bay we get porgies , usually near the wrecks. To find blues we need to get out to the deeper water, at leat 20 - 30 miles out.

We get threshers, but that is a rare fish for us.

However, we do get lots of big mackerel.

 

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25 minutes ago, JonC said:

But shaky Spence caught millions of sharks, must be something else there?

Yea he spends a lot of time sharking. Threshers are not around all year I believe. 

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