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anyone built a deep Clean engine flush


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Ive a Df 140   on my  175  and i flush the  engine  after every trip using  ( Salt -Off )   this is  put into a inline  Mixer     i saw on you tube a guy  was  flushing his  outboard using a  garden pond pump     so i thought about making one    so i bought a pond pump  and a few bits and bobs from the local Garden center     Hose  fitting that screws  into the side of the engine     plus a couple of  push fit  Hose Connectors     i then bought a  bottle of Barnacle  cleaner   ( Force 4 )     next thing was to make a sump up  that i could  put the pump in   Easy enough  as i had a old  30 Lt   Blue  drum    cut length ways   sorted     made a little  platform  to stand the pump on    so as once the  muck and crap came out of the Engine  the pump would not pick it up       once    sorted i  Ran the Engine up to working  Temp  on the  flush muffs   then connected the  pump up to the flush port on the side of the leg       with the engine stopped    i turned the    Garden pump on and left it  adding the  Barnacle  remover  into the sump     well if you though    flushing your engine   cleans it  think again  because     if you`d of seen the  sand  and crap  that came  out of my engine       the  engine now runs 3degree`s  cooler   than it did  before  the deep clean 

Engine Descaling pump 009.jpg

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its a 2011   Engine with  250  hours     ive  had it serviced  @ warrior boats   @ 200    hours     the  300 hour  ill do myself   as  a mate built me a  Diagnostics lead  so that i can plug it into a laptop     i always  carry   a  Service kit  with me     Bought off   Suzuki  marine GB    on Ebay   think it was £116      but the  kit comes with 6  anodes    but you need 7  ?   so the  guy at warrior told me   the service interval    is every 100   hours      impeller   change every 300 hours      

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I was changing the impeller every 200hrs on mine and couldn't believe how quickly the anodes go on them. Ive never had an engine hooked up to diagnostics before (from various dealers) they claim its only needed when you have an engine issue. The plugs only lasted about 200hrs in the Suzuki's too, funny how different they are to other brands.

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do you   use a salt neutraliser  when flushing your engine     i use  ( salt off )  you can also buy  salt away      check out the video`s on you tube     you can buy the mixer off ebay    maybe thats why  my anodes last a bit longer than yours  

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3 hours ago, JDP said:

I was changing the impeller every 200hrs on mine and couldn't believe how quickly the anodes go on them. Ive never had an engine hooked up to diagnostics before (from various dealers) they claim its only needed when you have an engine issue. The plugs only lasted about 200hrs in the Suzuki's too, funny how different they are to other brands.

 

The Zuk has the dubious name  of the 'Alka-Seltzer' engine in the UK ..............

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On 11/21/2021 at 11:13 PM, GPSguru said:

 

 

The Zuk has the dubious name  of the 'Alka-Seltzer' engine in the UK ..............

Yep that’s what I’ve heard…. Not sure if the newer ones are any better but saw one being serviced on weekend, no anode left after 200hrs running….

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13 hours ago, Odyssey said:

Yep that’s what I’ve heard…. Not sure if the newer ones are any better but saw one being serviced on weekend, no anode left after 200hrs running….

Its not so much the service hours but the time it takes people to do those hours. I would go through 4 services per year, 100hr oil change's and 200hr on the impeller, so could get away without changing the anodes as regularly as someone who might only do 100hrs per year. The amount of hours the engine has run doesn't really matter its the time period they have been in the engine that's more important. The 2014 model 140 I recently sold had no anodes left in it when I bought it even though they had been replaced 37 engine hours before according to the service receipts. Those 37hrs however had taken the previous owner almost 3yrs to do, hence why he sold it, he simply wasn't using it enough to justify owning a boat. 

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Sounds likely… some boats in U.K. get used for about 30 hours per year which isn’t much… they then get excited when they see an engine wirh 1000 hours on it… mine have for 1100 hours and are absolutely fine 🙂 

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4 hours ago, Odyssey said:

Sounds likely… some boats in U.K. get used for about 30 hours per year which isn’t much… they then get excited when they see an engine wirh 1000 hours on it… mine have for 1100 hours and are absolutely fine 🙂 

I have seen loads of posts on Facebook about people thinking they are doing well buying a boat that’s 15 years old with 200 hours on it, they don’t understand that it’s quite likely that the boat hasn’t been maintained. 

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So true on the hours, marine outboards with high hours isn't a bad thing, especially when they have stuck to the service schedule. We just replaced the Yamaha 250 with over 3000hrs from tow years of faultless daily work on the abalone and urchin boat I often skipper. It was only replaced as financially it doesn't cost anything to swap them them every two years under tax schemes. River tour boat operators here have been clocking 10,000hrs on twin f70 Yamaha's before replacing them, pretty much run all day every day.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/24/2021 at 2:37 PM, JonC said:

I have seen loads of posts on Facebook about people thinking they are doing well buying a boat that’s 15 years old with 200 hours on it, they don’t understand that it’s quite likely that the boat hasn’t been maintained. 

Yep - on a 15 year old engine, I'd sooner see at 750 hours - when I've looked at used boats it's clear the low hours ones are the ones that get neglected. Once you get to at least 50 hours a year, much more likely the boat is owned by an enthusiast who keeps up with maintenance and servicing - the ones that sit in a harbour/marina and get used three or four times a year are the ones to avoid.

 

With leisure hours engines, it's generally neglect and non-use that kills them rather than getting worn out - commercial users often get to 5000 hours before changing - that's 50-100 years for most leisure users!

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All our boats have been sold with low hours on engines, been serviced as per book.

most still with warranty.

flushed with salt-away every time after use.

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