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Shooters (warning dead animals)


JDP
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Strong winds kept my daughter off the water on the weekend so he headed into the mountains with her new 4x4 and gun. There's a fair bit of meat now in a friends Coolroom ready for butchering and sharing among friends.

All of these animals are feral pests introduced by the first European settlers. They cause extensive damage to native flora and fauna and have spread extensively over the country.

Back on the charters today she came home with a big bag of dolphin fish fillets. Looks like we are going to eating well for a while!!!

 

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That's quite a feed there Jon. How long will that lot keep you going? She's even got a wild pig in the back of the truck?

What are the licensing arrangements for gun ownership in Aus? Presume you also have open & closed seasons for hunting over there, or are they hunted all year round as non-native species?

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17 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

That's quite a feed there Jon. How long will that lot keep you going? She's even got a wild pig in the back of the truck?

What are the licensing arrangements for gun ownership in Aus? Presume you also have open & closed seasons for hunting over there, or are they hunted all year round as non-native species?

Gun licensing is very tight with all kinds of tests and regulations. The power you have to use is also regulated for certain species, the guns have to be powerful enough to bring some pretty big animals down. My daughter uses a 30 06 smallish gun which is the minimum for samba deer (donkey sized). Gun safes, ammo safes, bolts removed when in transport etc. As for seasons, these animals are all considered pests and killed by rangers from helicopters hundreds in a day which are just left to rot. The battle to keep numbers down is a loosing one in reality. Wild horses, camels, buffalo, deer, goats, pigs, dogs, cats, foxes, rabbits etc to name a few.

Personally I like the fact we are takeing animals from the wild where they have had a life without chemicals and growth hormones etc pumped into them like farmed animals. Then there's the stress farmed animals undergo being taken to market and killed in abattoirs and the way they are killed. The impact of farming and the cost environmentally is also a huge factor and why I support the taking of these from the wild.

Yes she also managed two pigs on the weekend, I love roast pork. In terms of how long it will last comes down to how many people this will all go to, we can only keep so much and she enjoys the hunt. I have some in a drier as dog treats, some is heading off to be made into sausages and room being made in the freezer tomorrow.

Not sure if you have ever bought a whole dressed lamb before but you don't actually get that much from one. My daughter is a big meat eater (everything eater in fact).  Also other shooting contacts that haven't been so lucky will be getting some of this, even the skins will be getting cured.

Its a very different way of living from the UK even though its also so similar.

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Just now, JDP said:

Gun licensing is very tight with all kinds of tests and regulations. The power you have to use is also regulated for certain species, the guns have to be powerful enough to bring some pretty big animals down. My daughter uses a 30 06 smallish gun which is the minimum for samba deer (donkey sized). Gun safes, ammo safes, bolts removed when in transport etc. As for seasons, these animals are all considered pests and killed by rangers from helicopters hundreds in a day which are just left to rot. The battle to keep numbers down is a loosing one in reality. Wild horses, camels, buffalo, deer, goats, pigs, dogs, cats, foxes, rabbits etc to name a few.

Personally I like the fact we are takeing animals from the wild where they have had a life without chemicals and growth hormones etc pumped into them like farmed animals. Then there's the stress farmed animals undergo being taken to market and killed in abattoirs and the way they are killed. The impact of farming and the cost environmentally is also a huge factor and why I support the taking of these from the wild.

Yes she also managed two pigs on the weekend, I love roast pork. In terms of how long it will last comes down to how many people this will all go to, we can only keep so much and she enjoys the hunt. I have some in a drier as dog treats, some is heading off to be made into sausages and room being made in the freezer tomorrow.

Not sure if you have ever bought a whole dressed lamb before but you don't actually get that much from one. My daughter is a big meat eater (everything eater in fact).  Also other shooting contacts that haven't been so lucky will be getting some of this, even the skins will be getting cured.

Its a very different way of living from the UK even though its also so similar.

Sounds very much like the gun licensing requirements we have over here. Completely agree about wild food (meat) being more morally acceptable than farmed food.

For our family it's pheasant when in season - my son loves pheasant curry - and occasionally wood pigeon. I've hunted deer and boar in the past but as I don't own a rifle I only hunt as a guest.

Here's a pic of a small walked-up shoot we did a few years ago - just three of us and two dogs walking the boundaries on a local estate after the main shoot days had finished. Mine's the dog on the left - she worked her socks off on that day, bless her.

SSSoxx7.jpg

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29 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

Sounds very much like the gun licensing requirements we have over here. Completely agree about wild food (meat) being more morally acceptable than farmed food.

For our family it's pheasant when in season - my son loves pheasant curry - and occasionally wood pigeon. I've hunted deer and boar in the past but as I don't own a rifle I only hunt as a guest.

Here's a pic of a small walked-up shoot we did a few years ago - just three of us and two dogs walking the boundaries on a local estate after the main shoot days had finished. Mine's the dog on the left - she worked her socks off on that day, bless her.

SSSoxx7.jpg

We used to eat a few pheasants off my Grandparents farm in the midlands, picking out shot was a pain!!!!

I don't shoot, one in the family shooting that much is already to much!!!!....she's planning on diving for lobsters after work tomorrow in her own boat.

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1 minute ago, JDP said:

 picking out shot was a pain!!!!

Agreed. I've taken to slicing up the breast meat into strips - it cooks through quicker like this for the curry and it makes it sooo much easier to find and remove the shot during the food prep.

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