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Teignmouth Saturday


thejollysinker

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6 minutes ago, thejollysinker said:

I only included the dogs for you know who 🤣

I haven’t seen any on the last 4-5 trips out which is great. Hopefully they will stay gone all winter and give a chance for for the cod to find out baits. 

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Top dangling that man!

@GPSguru did mention on Whatsapp that you were out. Glad to see you had a busy session. Alderney retrieval always used to give me a squeaky bum even in the best of conditions so I reckon you made the right call in snotty weather and single-handed. No prizes for trying to be a hero out there 👍

Good fish pics too. Shame you didn't get more dogs but I suppose you can't win 'em all.

#somanydogfishsolittletime

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52 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

Top dangling that man!

@GPSguru did mention on Whatsapp that you were out. Glad to see you had a busy session. Alderney retrieval always used to give me a squeaky bum even in the best of conditions so I reckon you made the right call in snotty weather and single-handed. No prizes for trying to be a hero out there 👍

Good fish pics too. Shame you didn't get more dogs but I suppose you can't win 'em all.

#somanydogfishsolittletime

Nothing gets past Ian down there does it 🤣

mate, I was crapping it just a bit when them waves were sloshing over the bow. I was jammed in the hatch like a dried up marmite lid….legs were feeling it today 🤣

I only managed to land 2 doggies, thankfully 😅 I do try to dissuade them with rather large baits and hooks but it doesn’t always work 🤣🤣🤣

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42 minutes ago, Saintly Fish said:

Nice going. Sounds like an exciting day on the water. I have hand hauled an anchor in less than desirable conditions a few times and it's no fun. Even worse if you don't have any gloves on!! 😬

Gloves 🤔

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6 hours ago, GPSguru said:

Regardless of how bad the sea is, by looping onto the stern gunnel cleat, you can always see the angle of the warp. If you don't use the stern cleat, then it is easy to lose sight of the warp and run over it.

I can't say I've ever had to do this Ian, but it's a dammed good idea!

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I’m sure @GPSguru has got his technique down when he’s doing this but it reads like the kill cord needs to be detached while the operator is away from the helm with the engine engaged forward? Or am I looking at this from the wrong end of the telescope? 

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33 minutes ago, JonC said:

I’m sure @GPSguru has got his technique down when he’s doing this but it reads like the kill cord needs to be detached while the operator is away from the helm with the engine engaged forward? Or am I looking at this from the wrong end of the telescope? 

I suppose it depends how long the boat is and how long the kill cord is, but in principle you make a fair point.

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3 hours ago, JonC said:

I’m sure @GPSguru has got his technique down when he’s doing this but it reads like the kill cord needs to be detached while the operator is away from the helm with the engine engaged forward? Or am I looking at this from the wrong end of the telescope? 

Yes, leave the kill cord off, however, If sea conditions dictate it should be worn, then just connect 2 together, as you should always have a spare on the boat.

TBH, I often use 2 cords if I am on my own, to allow freedom of movement to the stern.

 

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10 hours ago, GPSguru said:

OK, I understand the issue, this may help.

Once anchored, back off the warp until the buoy is about 30yards from the boat.

When you are ready to recover, clear the deck on the same side as the helm (I assume yours is starboard).

Move off at a 45 degree angle to the buoy and then watch the warp at the bow to maintain the angle, you will then be making a large arc around the buoy. The buoy will go under and the popup once the anchor has broken free.

This is the important bit .......... now the anchor has broken free, steer slightly straighter and the warp will come along side the boat. KEEP THE POWER ON, lean over the side and grab the warp (it will be almost at gunnel height), with the power still on leave the helm and run back to the stern still holding the warp and put a quick turn around the stern gunnel cleat.  Run back to the helm, and you can then watch the angle of the warp off the stern gunnel and the buoy. Open up with more throttle until the buoy is firmly being towed, then slow down to stationary and walk back to release the rope off the stern cleat. If you are not using a lazy line, then make a very low speed skid turn to point the bow at the buoy. Leave the engine on with the boat stationary and engine on idle, recover the warp and buoy. If you are using a lazy line, then just recover the warp and buoy from the stern, and then tie off the lazy line in its normal position.

Regardless of how bad the sea is, by looping onto the stern gunnel cleat, you can always see the angle of the warp. If you don't use the stern cleat, then it is easy to lose sight of the warp and run over it.

Also, you should always have your anchor set to trip, even with the slightest snag. Mine will trip about 1 in 5 times when recovering. Just replace the cable tie, and ready to go.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Right, I now understand more what I'm doing wrong either through lack of research or reading articles that explain differently. The biggest single issue must be me not leaving enough space between the boat and the buoy!  I'll try again next time to give this a try.

When I have managed to successfully use this technique in the past I haven't had any issues but that was in different conditions. I have in the past thought about rigging up some more metalwork on the rear rails with a standoff arm to run the rope through so it will never be near the engine if you can picture it? I honestly think I'd struggle to cleat it off as the cleats are sunken into the top moulding which I don't think is a good design feature as it makes it more awkward to rope things off including the mooring ropes.

The anchor is set to trip but this time it didn't (with the same cable tie configuration I've used before) so I'll change that to make it trip easier. For info. I use the port side to haul it and store some of the rode along with chain, anchor and buoy in a big flexi bucket while the rest of it runs atop to the anchor well.

I have actually got a stainless tube attached to the end of the rode so in an emergency I could just dump the whole lot and retrieve later. Trouble with that is there would be 220m of rope behind the boat and I probably wouldn't even be able to see the buoy 🤣

Thanks for the advice Ian 😊

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3 hours ago, thejollysinker said:

Right, I now understand more what I'm doing wrong either through lack of research or reading articles that explain differently. The biggest single issue must be me not leaving enough space between the boat and the buoy!  I'll try again next time to give this a try.

When I have managed to successfully use this technique in the past I haven't had any issues but that was in different conditions. I have in the past thought about rigging up some more metalwork on the rear rails with a standoff arm to run the rope through so it will never be near the engine if you can picture it? I honestly think I'd struggle to cleat it off as the cleats are sunken into the top moulding which I don't think is a good design feature as it makes it more awkward to rope things off including the mooring ropes.

The anchor is set to trip but this time it didn't (with the same cable tie configuration I've used before) so I'll change that to make it trip easier. For info. I use the port side to haul it and store some of the rode along with chain, anchor and buoy in a big flexi bucket while the rest of it runs atop to the anchor well.

I have actually got a stainless tube attached to the end of the rode so in an emergency I could just dump the whole lot and retrieve later. Trouble with that is there would be 220m of rope behind the boat and I probably wouldn't even be able to see the buoy 🤣

Thanks for the advice Ian 😊

Is your helm on the port side ? As you always  should recover on the same side as the helm.

With regard to the stern cleats, you can just take a single turn around anything on the stern as it is still the bow that is taking the strain. I take a single turn around the stern mooring cleat on the tube !

Yes, not leaving a good distance from bow to buoy is a common error. The closer it is, the smaller the arc that you tend to take, and therefore have less visibility and less control.

 

Edited by GPSguru
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I definitely wouldn't tie off to a stern cleat if you are a little unsure or not fully confident you have raised the anchor off the sea bed first. GPSguru is very experienced so he may be happy that way but i wouldn't advise it. The main factor has already been mentioned and that is to ensure your buoy is far enough in front of the boat at the start of the manoeuvre. We were taught to also raise the anchor on the other side to the helm on our RYA PBL2. Each to their own and confidence will play a big part in how you do it. 

 

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3 hours ago, Dicky said:

I definitely wouldn't tie off to a stern cleat if you are a little unsure or not fully confident you have raised the anchor off the sea bed first.

No, we don't tie off to the stern cleat, we just take one turn around it, so pretty easy to slip it off if it turns pear shaped. Generally if the buoy has popped up then the anchor has broken free. Very often I just put the warp on the inside of the cleat, which is often good enough to see what you are doing, and to keep the warp away from the prop.

I also carry a knife on my belt at all times and there is another in the stern pocket.

Fortunately, we don't experience tides speed like you guys in the BC. Even on a raging spring, Gary would have only been in 2kts max.

Out at sea in Lyme Bay you will be hard pushed to find 2kts of tide. Usually 0.5 to 1.5 on most tides.

 

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23 hours ago, GPSguru said:

Is your helm on the port side ? As you always  should recover on the same side as the helm.

With regard to the stern cleats, you can just take a single turn around anything on the stern as it is still the bow that is taking the strain. I take a single turn around the stern mooring cleat on the tube !

Yes, not leaving a good distance from bow to buoy is a common error. The closer it is, the smaller the arc that you tend to take, and therefore have less visibility and less control.

 

my helm is on the starboard side and I recover from the port side.

Recovering from the same side as the helm makes me now understand your earlier comment about making a 'very low speed skid turn' and also about looping the rode over the cleat which would work even with my cleats where they are 👍

 

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4 hours ago, JonC said:

Just a thought, when you next go to the boat have a look on the dashboard to see if you have one of these buttons, they really take the ball ache out of things. 

IMG_0849.jpeg

 

 

I've only got this one..... 

Untitled-2.thumb.png.82a88254ae9cec877250a4964d02ae2f.png

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