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well i have heard so many diferent things about uptiding please put me strate on this.

i know you yous a longer road than the normal  40 \ 50 lb rod

i have only seen this done  where a 6 oz  whaite will do why not youse your beach road

 

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Beach rods are a bit long mate, and that can be awkward on a full boat. Also their rating is a bit low. Uptides are usually 9ft6, and can cast up to 10-12 oz leads (more at a push 😉). The length helps get that bow of line away from the boat and downtide lines....

70ft of water is about as deep as you want to be uptiding.....

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1 minute ago, Scotch_Egg2012 said:

Beach rod is too long, usual uptidersare around 9 - 10 ft have a different action to make it easier to load up for casting as you have limited room.  Depending where you fish and the depth you may end up with as much as 10oz to get it to hold. 

normaly the lead is 1lb to 2 ib , in the solent i o white area, unles you are in shelterd  arears, evan from calshott beach i have had tuble with 8 oz brake away  on some tides

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Just now, suzook12 said:

Beach rods are a bit long mate, and that can be awkward on a full boat. Also their rating is a bit low. Uptides are usually 9ft6, and can cast up to 10-12 oz leads (more at a push 😉). The length helps get that bow of line away from the boat and downtide lines....

70ft of water is about as deep as you want to be uptiding.....

i agree but i  every time i see the uptide rod out, the line  it ends up dead astern with the outhers.  in a mess.

i tend to put a heavyer whaite on and hand throw it,  hopfully it stays where it lands

i know it can be dangerouse , but i youse a modyfied setup so the hock is on the outside of the boat plus im not throwiit that far

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I think you need to look at your terminal tackle pete. You don't use breakaway leads except in light tides, we use long tail fixed wire leads, then the bow in the line is equally important. You have to put a big enough bow in the line that the tide is pullung the lead tail down, too little and the lead tail is pulled up then the lead lets go..... Takes a bit of getting used to, when the tide is running hard, if you cast say 30ft from the boat, allow enough line out so that it is running pretty much parallel with the boat. Most bites from decent fish are dropbacks and dislodge the lead.....

 

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I rarely use a lead of more than 7oz, although at times an 8oz becomes necessary. 
As suzook says it’s all about letting a bow of line out to get the lead working properly. You could send 3lb of lead uptide and it would still get bounced back down if you have it wound down too tight.

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9 minutes ago, JonC said:

I rarely use a lead of more than 7oz, although at times an 8oz becomes necessary. 
As suzook says it’s all about letting a bow of line out to get the lead working properly. You could send 3lb of lead uptide and it would still get bounced back down if you have it wound down too tight.

How do you tell when enough of a line is set out? The reason I ask is because whenever I’ve tried it the line always ends up looking as if he weight has just gone down tide. 

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Whenever I end up next to person who has never uptidr fished before (too often lol), I usually just get them to set it as described above, as though tide is ripping, so 30ft straight in front of you, release enough line so that bow is parallel to boat. On your own boat, you can actually cast uptide (hence the name) and fish two or three rods at varying positions along the tide.

Eventually, you will get a feel for how big a bow a tide actually needs. In shallower water, sometimes uptide is the only method that holds bottom, but watch for weed that will drag you in to one hell of a birds nest.

Shame currently you can't go out with either myself or Jon, as I'm sure we would soon get you sorted.

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5 hours ago, suzook12 said:

Whenever I end up next to person who has never uptidr fished before (too often lol), I usually just get them to set it as described above, as though tide is ripping, so 30ft straight in front of you, release enough line so that bow is parallel to boat. On your own boat, you can actually cast uptide (hence the name) and fish two or three rods at varying positions along the tide.

Eventually, you will get a feel for how big a bow a tide actually needs. In shallower water, sometimes uptide is the only method that holds bottom, but watch for weed that will drag you in to one hell of a birds nest.

Shame currently you can't go out with either myself or Jon, as I'm sure we would soon get you sorted.

When I used to fish out of Dover we often fished in 80-100’ of water. I would generally fish uptide to get my lines away from the other people. If you are on a trip with rod hires(noddies) the back of the boat could be one big tangle so it makes sense to plot up in the shelter of the wheel house and fish away from the others. 

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8 hours ago, captin slows old outlaw said:

normaly the lead is 1lb to 2 ib , in the solent i o white area, unles you are in shelterd  arears, evan from calshott beach i have had tuble with 8 oz brake away  on some tides

I fish Nab, Needles and Solent,  I was at East Lepe a few weeks back on a fair sized tide uptiding on an 8oz weight whilst the downtider on braid had nearly a pound to hold.  As others have pointed out the design of the weight and more importantly how much line you put out in the bow is the difference between holding bottom or not. 

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7 hours ago, Saintly Fish said:

How do you tell when enough of a line is set out? The reason I ask is because whenever I’ve tried it the line always ends up looking as if he weight has just gone down tide. 

Around the solent it looks exactly like you are down tiding,  I out enough line so that it will be trailing as if downtiding,  I rarely need above 8oz.  How you cast in relation to the tide also influences how well it holds,  i.e. When the tide is running hard I will be casting up towards the anchor rope a letting a big bow out, as the tide eases you can bring the cast further down to around 90 degrees from the side of the boat.  

Picture was taken last year down by Selsey (quite a tide run) I had cast up towards the anchor and this shows where my line ended upIMG-20200602-WA0000.thumb.jpeg.5932205d2622649fcc33fbb0e98d3b54.jpeg

Edited by Scotch_Egg2012
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6 minutes ago, Odyssey said:

Anyone uptide with braid? 

I have heard of it but I prefer mono as it catches more tide and helps pull the weight into the seabed. I use 25lb mono which is a nice balance used to use 30lb but it's much more of a bugger to hold in bigger tide runs

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7 minutes ago, Odyssey said:

Anyone uptide with braid? 

I’m experimenting at the moment, but not had any big tide runs to test it properly.

A big down side it that I do like to cast it a fair way which isn’t a great idea with braid and level wind. 

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1 minute ago, Scotch_Egg2012 said:

I have heard of it but I prefer mono as it catches more tide and helps pull the weight into the seabed. I use 25lb mono which is a nice balance used to use 30lb but it's much more of a bugger to hold in bigger tide runs

I use 18 or 20lb no leader. Leaders have no place on a boat if casting. 

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4 minutes ago, Scotch_Egg2012 said:

I have heard of it but I prefer mono as it catches more tide and helps pull the weight into the seabed. I use 25lb mono which is a nice balance used to use 30lb but it's much more of a bugger to hold in bigger tide runs

In theory then we could use whatever braid has the same diameter as 25lb mono? Or is there some other reason that mono is preferable?

Reason I ask is that I've done a bit of uptiding, with braid, and it seemed to work ok, and I'm not sure I can be buggered to spool up a reel with mono again - I only ever use mono for leader material these days.

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1 minute ago, Andy135 said:

In theory then we could use whatever mo o has the same diameter as 25lb mono? Or is there some other reason that mono is preferable.

Reason I ask is that I've done a bit of uptiding, with braid, and it seemed to work ok, and I'm not sure I can be buggered to spool up a reel with mono again - I only ever use mono for leader material these days.

This is one good reason. 

89F29E52-FFA4-415B-8381-74DDF6AAC966.png

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Just now, JonC said:

This is one good reason. 

89F29E52-FFA4-415B-8381-74DDF6AAC966.png

Yeah, that's funny but not really realistic, given that on the boat we're only really giving it a lob, not a full beans cast, and nothing that can't be managed with an educated thumb.

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1 minute ago, Andy135 said:

Yeah, that's funny but not really realistic, given that on the boat we're only really giving it a lob, not a full beans cast, and nothing that can't be managed with an educated thumb.

I bet you could manage it. 

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1 minute ago, Andy135 said:

In theory then we could use whatever mono has the same diameter as 25lb mono? Or is there some other reason that mono is preferable.

Reason I ask is that I've done a bit of uptiding, with braid, and it seemed to work ok, and I'm not sure I can be buggered to spool up a reel with mono again - I only ever use mono for leader material these days.

I think with diameter or poundage you need to find out what works best for you, the reason I use 25 and not 30 is on spots like the spoils it's 80ft and the tide can run hard 30 is a bugger to keep the weight dug in I like Berkeley 25 as that holds well,  I haven't dropped to 20 because of the amount of weed we can come across especially Selsey area.  The 25 gives me a bit more confidence to lean into it and get the gear back. 

The reason I use mono is I find braid is an ass to cast on a multiplier and it's easier to get the weight dug in with mono as it catches more tide, again though it's all what works for you

 

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3 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

Yeah, that's funny but not really realistic, given that on the boat we're only really giving it a lob, not a full beans cast, and nothing that can't be managed with an educated thumb.

Sometimes a bit more than a lob is required though, especially if casting up towards the anchor. 

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5 minutes ago, Scotch_Egg2012 said:

Sometimes a bit more than a lob is required though, especially if casting up towards the anchor. 

Yes for sure, if it’s running hard then I cast 3/4 way forward as far as I can knowing it will be at least square leg by the time it touches the bottom, then will roll a bit before it settles. 

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