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Filler for below the waterline


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Next job on the list is to rub down the hull and give it a coat of paint/flo coat. There is the remains of a keel band on the hull as well as a few gouges that could do with some filler. 

What is best to use, I've got myself confused. I was going to use this https://www.force4.co.uk/item/Plastic-Padding/Teroson-UP-610-Marine-Filler-Small/CJF?utm_source=google&utm_medium=base&utm_campaign=base&stock=16251&gclid=Cj0KCQjw9YWDBhDyARIsADt6sGZ0uiXBwWGMVA0ymVgg2S_7UDQ0yX5WKo5oz09drVjX1IZA7-oCMiQaAuE3EALw_wcB

But it is sold here as above waterline, the description says its suitable for hull repairs and the Teroson site says its not suitable for below waterline on a wooden boat. Mine is fibreglass so is it OK to use? Any other recommendations for a suitable filler? I assume standard easy sand body filler isn't any good? 

 

thanks

Adam

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Hi Adam,

I'll leave it to the experts to advise on the right filler, but it may help them if you can confirm how you'll be using the boat. Am I right in thinking that your boat will be on a trailer, and not left in the water all season?

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33 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

Hi Adam,

I'll leave it to the experts to advise on the right filler, but it may help them if you can confirm how you'll be using the boat. Am I right in thinking that your boat will be on a trailer, and not left in the water all season?

Yes, on a trailer and only in the water when we are using it 

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1 hour ago, Gordmac said:

Fill holes with epoxy and gouges with gellcoat filler?

To my expense I found out that filling holes with epoxy is not the done thing. Somebody who owned my boat before me had done that around my bow thruster and the epoxy delaminated and wicked in water. So, not recommended.

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East Coast Fibreglass supplies Link  they know their stuff, I got some gel coat mixed to the colour of my hull using the RAL code.  Give them a call and ask what they recommend.  They sell in small quantities.  Also on the site are some great videos of repair techniques.  Plastic padding will absorb water as far as I know.  

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As a general rule, if the layup is polyester we repair with polyester and if the layup is epoxy we repair with epoxy. It is best not to use body filler above or below the WL. If the gouges are not very deep ensure that the surfaces are very dry, clean and well abraided. The gouges can then be filled using resin with chopped strand and  sanded back to just slightly below the finished surface. The gelcoat around the gouge should be cleaned and lightly abraided to ensure good adhesion and must be perfectly dry (gently warm with a hot gun if necessary). Matching gelcoat can then be applied to the repaired area and should be covered with masking tape and smoothed over by hand. When the gelcoat is fully cured remove the tape and then the area can be sanded back (best with the use of a hard rubber sanding block). Sand the repaired area with W&D paper, starting with about 240 grade and working up to about 1200 grade by which time the repair should look pretty good. Buff the area to a deep shine (easiest with a buffing machine, but small areas are quite easy by hand) and then apply polish before standing back and admiring your work!!! Good luck. NB. the above assumes that  we are only talking about light and fairly  shallow gouges - if the layup is damaged or cracked the repair would involve more seriou☺️s work. Geoff.

Edited by Geoff
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13 hours ago, suzook12 said:

I like the work he’s been doing on that transom rebuild.  Think on last episode he said it was going to end up being about 3 or 4 inches thick.  Maybe add a link to the YouTube thread and keep these together?  

If wood is your thing the Sampson Boat Project is interesting.  

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17 hours ago, Saintly Fish said:

To my expense I found out that filling holes with epoxy is not the done thing. Somebody who owned my boat before me had done that around my bow thruster and the epoxy delaminated and wicked in water. So, not recommended.

Reckon it would be ok for a trailer boat though? Adam's boat probably won't be in the water for more than 12 hours at a time.

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15 minutes ago, OrkneyCorkney said:

Probably, but, like Saintly has found out what happens when Adam sells boat on and new owner keeps her on mooring?  I’m minded to just do best job and be right for future.   

That's a fair shout. 👍

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25 minutes ago, OrkneyCorkney said:

Did I read the boat in question was a Wilson Flyer?  Would that be a short cabin version like the TA fishing one or a long cabin?  Certainly have a good reputation and I think someone is still building them today.   

Garry Bull was building them, bought the moulds and the rights, he has since moved on to other things and was/has selling/sold the moulds on..... Wilson boats has come to an end I believe.

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As far as epoxy goes, I belive it can go on top of polyester but polyester can't go on top of epoxy? Think I have that the right way round.....

Preparation is key, no matter what you use otherwise it won't bond properly regardless.

Best practice is to use like for like as Geoff says

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1 hour ago, OrkneyCorkney said:

Did I read the boat in question was a Wilson Flyer?  Would that be a short cabin version like the TA fishing one or a long cabin?  Certainly have a good reputation and I think someone is still building them today.   

it was sold to us as a Wilson but when we sent a picture to Wilson to get a replacement front hatch he said it wasn't one. Not sure what it is, could be a Pilot 520.

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16 hours ago, Geoff said:

As a general rule, if the layup is polyester we repair with polyester and if the layup is epoxy we repair with epoxy. It is best not to use body filler above or below the WL. If the gouges are not very deep ensure that the surfaces are very dry, clean and well abraided. The gouges can then be filled using resin with chopped strand and  sanded back to just slightly below the finished surface. The gelcoat around the gouge should be cleaned and lightly abraided to ensure good adhesion and must be perfectly dry (gently warm with a hot gun if necessary). Matching gelcoat can then be applied to the repaired area and should be covered with masking tape and smoothed over by hand. When the gelcoat is fully cured remove the tape and then the area can be sanded back (best with the use of a hard rubber sanding block). Sand the repaired area with W&D paper, starting with about 240 grade and working up to about 1200 grade by which time the repair should look pretty good. Buff the area to a deep shine (easiest with a buffing machine, but small areas are quite easy by hand) and then apply polish before standing back and admiring your work!!! Good luck. NB. the above assumes that  we are only talking about light and fairly  shallow gouges - if the layup is damaged or cracked the repair would involve more seriou☺️s work. Geoff.

How do I tell what it is? 

For the screw holes left from the keel band, would you fill just fill with fibreglass resin? 

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For the screw holes ( I presume fairly small screws and access from outside only)I would use a drill to clean back inside the hole (screw size) and lightly sand the gelcoat around the hole,then just "hydraulic" gelcoat up into the hole and apply masking tape as for the other repair. If the gelcoat is chipped or damaged around the hole it would be better to countersink the hole such that the gelcoat covers the damage. If the keelband was bolted through it would need a different approach. It is almost certain that your boat was laid up with polyester. As Steve said earlier, polyester can be repaired (taking great care) with epoxy, but not the other way around. With allFG repairs it is imperative that the repair area is totally dry.☺️ Geoff.

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4 hours ago, OrkneyCorkney said:

Out of interest, would I be right to say most mass produced boats are polyester as epoxy is more expensive?  

Certainly older boats, I can't comment on newer boats as out of my price range so haven't looked...

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