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My colvic seems to fill up rather a lot


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So after bouts of heavy rain and even not so heavy rain, the bilges gather a fair bit of water - new to boat owning im uncertain whats normal, especially on a 40+ yr old boat with a wooden wheelhouse. 

after a week or two it seems like the bilge pumps out about half a bucket to a bucket (ive never measured it)

i have identified the hatch leaks (i first assumed it was just condensation on the glass) but having sat in it during the rain i know it leaks - Job number 1 - tbc 

The ceiling under the dash in the wheel house was also showing signs of water ingress (this is where the old fibre glass foredeck goes under the wheelhouse to form the base of the dash inside the wheelhouse - i have sealed the join from bottom of front windows to fore deck with tiger seal, some wide plastic bath trim (had to be flexible doe tot he P/S curve of the deck), and further sealed that with clear silicone.

I have also last night ran clear silicone around the entire joins between fibreglass hull and wooden wheel house and wooden cockpit trim. 

I will at some point this year replace the old canvas cover with a PVC one (although htis doens leak as its rubber backed it doesnt fit very snug)

is there any thing else i might be missing? and other precations? how can i be certain itsnot coming up, rather than down? without tasting the bilge water to see if its salty?

many thanks

 

Colvic-20-_57.thumb.jpg.4fe1841f504954f40bccd9847d54ddcc.jpg

 

 

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First thing to do Mike is I’m afraid the taste test. If it’s salty, look harder for a leak on the cooling system (not sure how yours works) or other possible areas. If it’s fresh then dry everything up, then place blue roll everywhere in the bilge. Then you can either hose the outside or wait for rain. Then check the blue roll. If it’s wet it will narrow down the area to search at least. 

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Yep. The taste test is probably the best (quickest) way of working out what's going on. But.... here's a chance to learn from my mistake... if you see moisture under or around the batteries don't try the taste test. Turns out it wasn't water in my case, and I can confirm that battery acid stings a bit on the tongue!! 😖🤣

My guess is that it will be rainwater in your case though. Looking at your pic above, does rainwater not run sternwards off the wheelhouse roof and under the cover into the cockpit? Is there a lip or channel to stop the water just running under?

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2 hours ago, mike farrants said:

thats a good shout andy - perhaps it does there's a small lip - but i will test it with a hose

Remember also that any breeze that blows from bow to stern may blow under the edge of your cover and push any water trapped by the lip up and over it. The more I think about it the more I reckon this is at least part of your problem here.

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yes plus the fact that now with full fuel tank, full spare fuel tank, anchor and rope all in the stern, it may be angled backward more than flat  - making it worse.

the bigger concern was the moisture in cabin roof - i guess that was coming down from where the wheelhouse joined the deck, but could have been condensation rising from the water ingress from elsewhere...... 

well  ive sealed the wheelhouse i think (and did it when the timber would have been at its driest)

still to do - new on seal the hatch, new better fitting cover, and install a lip on the wheelhouse roof - any suggestions here?  

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44 minutes ago, mike farrants said:

yes plus the fact that now with full fuel tank, full spare fuel tank, anchor and rope all in the stern, it may be angled backward more than flat  - making it worse.

the bigger concern was the moisture in cabin roof - i guess that was coming down from where the wheelhouse joined the deck, but could have been condensation rising from the water ingress from elsewhere...... 

well  ive sealed the wheelhouse i think (and did it when the timber would have been at its driest)

still to do - new on seal the hatch, new better fitting cover, and install a lip on the wheelhouse roof - any suggestions here?  

With an older boat, it is probably rainwater. Have you had less bilge water during this recent dry spell ?

To try and find out where rainwater is getting in can be a nightmare, especially on a 40 year old boat.

Years ago I had a Shetland 570 (trailered)  that I refurbished and every time it rained, there was quite a considerable water intake, enough for me to leave the bung out !

I sealed everything I could think of, but I never cured the problem, so I feel your pain Mike !

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yeah i guess it could be life in an old boat - especially timber - i know how it can warp and shrink. 

weirdly i pumped it out on saturday, took her our for a jolly, and yet last night there was still a litre in her at least - and it hadnt rained - i know the water may have moved around - eg it might have pumped dry but only that section, guess im going to have to do the taste test! 

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2 hours ago, mike farrants said:

yes plus the fact that now with full fuel tank, full spare fuel tank, anchor and rope all in the stern, it may be angled backward more than flat  - making it worse.

the bigger concern was the moisture in cabin roof - i guess that was coming down from where the wheelhouse joined the deck, but could have been condensation rising from the water ingress from elsewhere...... 

well  ive sealed the wheelhouse i think (and did it when the timber would have been at its driest)

still to do - new on seal the hatch, new better fitting cover, and install a lip on the wheelhouse roof - any suggestions here?  

Nice piece of guttering all round with a couple of down pipes would look good.😆

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39 minutes ago, JonC said:

Have you checked your stern gland when your underway? ( I’m not known for reading all the details)

This is a surprisingly sensible suggestion from you.

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8 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

The bit that keeps the sea from getting in past your prop shaft.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuffing_box

http://coxeng.co.uk/stern-gear/stern-glands/

got it now thanks! was getting confused with Bungs - i dont have a self draining cockpit so no bungs- but will have a stern gland - i'll take a look at it! 

 

 

 

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17 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

This is a surprisingly sensible suggestion from you.

Sorry I’ll try to be more like you in future Mr Spock

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6 minutes ago, Andy135 said:

Ok, good. Ta.

I just wish I knew how to copy and paste then I could get the credit for other people’s suggestions 

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26 minutes ago, JonC said:

I just wish I knew how to copy and paste then I could get the credit for other people’s suggestions 

Well you already know how to copy & paste other people's photos...

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Other option….

Fill a watering can with water. Pour in some food colouring and pour on parts of boat. 
 

You can even do a few cans with different colours so that you can see where it’s coming in as it may take a while to seep in 

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2 hours ago, mike farrants said:

got it now thanks! was getting confused with Bungs - i dont have a self draining cockpit so no bungs- but will have a stern gland - i'll take a look at it! 

 

 

 

I am not a fan of taste testing bildge water 🤮🤢

You can measure the salinity with a refractometer, which can be bought for £12 - £15.

Edited by GPSguru
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18 minutes ago, GPSguru said:

I am not a fan of taste testing bildge water 🤮🤢

You can measure the salinity with a refractometer, which can be bought for £12 - £15.

Personally I wouldn’t trust the accuracy of a refractometer, they are hit and miss. I use one of these to test my bilge water. Accurate to 0.018, but hey if you’re happy chancing it crack on. 

2B3ABD88-8AD8-43F5-A95E-FF54C5A1CE0F.jpeg

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4 minutes ago, JonC said:

Personally I wouldn’t trust the accuracy of a refractometer, they are hit and miss. I use one of these to test my bilge water. Accurate to 0.018, but hey if you’re happy chancing it crack on. 

2B3ABD88-8AD8-43F5-A95E-FF54C5A1CE0F.jpeg

What that, another stolen picture ? 🤣🤣🤣🤣🤣

If it is good enough for a marine aquarium, then it will be ok for the bilge, also the result can be compared to the sea water.

Edited by GPSguru
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Just now, GPSguru said:

If it is good enough fir a marine aquarium, then it will be ok for the bilge, also the result can be compared to the sea water.

Refractometers for marine aquarium are ok for ball park readings or fish only but nowhere near accurate enough for soft or hard corals . 
 

Oh look another thread you have wrecked 

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1 hour ago, JonC said:

Refractometers for marine aquarium are ok for ball park readings or fish only but nowhere near accurate enough for soft or hard corals . 
 

Oh look another thread you have wrecked 

You know as much about corals as flying to the feck’in moon 🙄

We now all measure your posts with an oxometer, this device measures bullshit to a high degree of accuracy 🤣

 

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