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Auxiliary outboard


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Probably going to be a bit controversial!!

I have a suzuki 5 hp four stroke outboard that I used on my pilothouse 640 as an auxiliary (actually never used it)

Now I have a much heavier Beneteau Antares 7 with nanni 155hp engine with just 200 hours on which is serviced every year.

First question.... is the 5 hp actually going to be big enough??

Second Question... with amount of radios, electronics, life saving equipment we have on board (everything except a life raft) is it actually worth having an auxiliary. Only ever 12 miles out and right between two lifeboat stations.

Any thoughts very welcome.

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I don't have an aux on my boat, and didn't have one on my previous boat either. Engines are so reliable these days that any breakdown is more likely to be down to poor battery charge management, which is itself something that every boat owner should keep on top of.

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I think it will depend on your fishing.

Look at a charter boat. Maybe running a single shaft. He won’t have an aux. However, will most likely be well maintained. 
 

One failure mode you need to consider is lack of steering, what happens then on an outboard boat? (Less likely on a shaft?)

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I used to be anti aux but then  I had a nasty prop foul up and it changed my mind,sitting stuck 10 miles out on a cold weekday in march( was my birthday). I know it’s limitations- it won’t get me home 10 miles home but it will get me somewhere, to a nearest port or even land if shit hit the fan. 
I hung my tohatsu 6hp on the back of my boat today, which has been stowed for a year or so. It started after a couple of pulls with the fuel that’s been in the tank a similar time. I ran across the tide at 5 knots nicely. In winter there are very few other boats about in my area no such thing as sea start here and I would fill like a dick getting the RNLI out to drag me a mile or so home.

 

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7 hours ago, andydavy said:

Probably going to be a bit controversial!!

I have a suzuki 5 hp four stroke outboard that I used on my pilothouse 640 as an auxiliary (actually never used it)

Now I have a much heavier Beneteau Antares 7 with nanni 155hp engine with just 200 hours on which is serviced every year.

First question.... is the 5 hp actually going to be big enough??

Second Question... with amount of radios, electronics, life saving equipment we have on board (everything except a life raft) is it actually worth having an auxiliary. Only ever 12 miles out and right between two lifeboat stations.

Any thoughts very welcome.

I think it's fair to say you need an aux in excess of 150hp!!

In all seriousness tho, try your 5 first. There are engines pretty light up to 9hp or so should the 5 not be up to

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On 12/29/2020 at 7:03 PM, Odyssey said:

I think it will depend on your fishing.

Look at a charter boat. Maybe running a single shaft. He won’t have an aux. However, will most likely be well maintained. 
 

One failure mode you need to consider is lack of steering, what happens then on an outboard boat? (Less likely on a shaft?)

I carry a teak tiller that I will lash to the engine (there are a couple of nice eyes on my engine) with the cover off. 

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I do not know if it is true, but I have been told that if the aux. outboard is locked in a helm neutral position it is possible to steer the boat with the normal helm to some degree. This may of course  need the locked outboard adjusting from time to time. Geoff.

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25 minutes ago, Geoff said:

I do not know if it is true, but I have been told that if the aux. outboard is locked in a helm neutral position it is possible to steer the boat with the normal helm to some degree. This may of course  need the locked outboard adjusting from time to time. Geoff.

Yes you can, I did it Tuesday. It’s not great, but general direction is doable. To steer properly you need the water passing the boats rudder as motor boat rudders are tiny, 2 square foot area whereas a sailing boat may have 6 square feet of area. 
If I was going to attempt a long run on the aux I would lock it in middle and go and sit in the shed and steer. 

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On 12/31/2020 at 8:58 PM, JonC said:

Yes you can, I did it Tuesday. It’s not great, but general direction is doable. To steer properly you need the water passing the boats rudder as motor boat rudders are tiny, 2 square foot area whereas a sailing boat may have 6 square feet of area. 
If I was going to attempt a long run on the aux I would lock it in middle and go and sit in the shed and steer. 

Was it used in anger, or as an experiment

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49 minutes ago, jonnyswamp said:

Was it used in anger, or as an experiment

I was just giving it a yearly run out, only ever once started it in anger when I had air in diesel because of a leaking filter

 

i will add though that I never actually used it to go anywhere as I fixed the fuel leak. 

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I used the term lock outboard in helm neutral position (with normal helm in middle) to compensate for any differences by caused wind,tide motor offset etc. Geoff.

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 12/31/2020 at 8:28 PM, Geoff said:

I do not know if it is true, but I have been told that if the aux. outboard is locked in a helm neutral position it is possible to steer the boat with the normal helm to some degree. This may of course  need the locked outboard adjusting from time to time. Geoff.

It's true! I use my auxiliary in this way (when I can get it to start!) Much more convenient than using an extension steering arm on the little engine. Only problem is that turns are a lot slower, but it does work. PH

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Just an idea I have had about using my Carrera on the river. I have an old mariner 9.9 2t LS with electric start. I am thinking about fitting it as an aux (leg problems on the Carrera). I have the OB controls etc., but steering the way mentioned would not be practical on the river. I am thinking of making an electric tiller to steer the OB which could still be linked to the normal helm. I intend to use an older car (ex Triumph stag) window winding motor as that already has the rotary/linear conversion already fitted. I had thought about using a wind screen motor, but the window motor is much heavier duty. I think this is do-able. Any thoughts? If this works I may try to do something similar on my nearly finished Fenline. Geoff. 

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2 hours ago, captin slows old outlaw said:

geff nealy  😬 finished  😬 i better get on with mine then.

Don't worry Pete - I was nearly finished a year ago! Geoff.:classic_wink:

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 12/29/2020 at 8:36 PM, JonC said:

I used to be anti aux but then  I had a nasty prop foul up and it changed my mind,sitting stuck 10 miles out on a cold weekday in march( was my birthday). I know it’s limitations- it won’t get me home 10 miles home but it will get me somewhere, to a nearest port or even land if shit hit the fan. 
I hung my tohatsu 6hp on the back of my boat today, which has been stowed for a year or so. It started after a couple of pulls with the fuel that’s been in the tank a similar time. I ran across the tide at 5 knots nicely. In winter there are very few other boats about in my area no such thing as sea start here and I would fill like a dick getting the RNLI out to drag me a mile or so home.

 

 

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I agree! I'm based in Plymouth where there is no effective rescue service except the RNLI. There are a tremendous amount of pot, net and wrasse trap buoys inshore, many of them just dark blue or black 5l oil drums which are impossible to see in a wave or bad light. Some of the buoys are inadequate when set in a fast tide run and just submerge. A couple of years ago I was coming round Rame Head on the plane when I hit a submerged buoy and came to an abrupt stop. Fortunately it cleared itself, but when I had the engine serviced the engineer said I was very lucky that it wasn't disabled. In that case I would have needed my 5hp auxiliary to limp home. I have also fouled the prop on a clear plastic bag which I didn't see and which stopped the engine dead, and on a mooring rope (my fault) which wrapped round the prop. My main engine is a 60hp Mariner regularly serviced from new, and the battery is used only for starting the engine, but things can still go wrong. If would feel less safe without my auxiliary, which runs on an integral tank. I also carry spare petrol at all times. PH

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